February New Hampshire Notes

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The way winter is supposed to be!

The way winter is supposed to be!

When I lived in California, the winter weather was only slightly different than summer weather.  Winter was somewhat colder and in the good years, it rained.  Temperatures rarely got below freezing. Some trees lost their leaves in December or January, but began growing new ones in February.

Once I began thinking about moving back to New England, I envisioned curling up with a good book and occasionally looking out the window at the drifting snowflakes all winter long.  I enjoy walking in the snow and hearing it crunch.  I relish the way snow transforms the landscape.  And I like COLD weather. 

Winter is supposed to be from December 20 something to March 20 something.  Well, this year February was disappointing.  A little snowstorm, many warm days causing the snow to melt fast, then another 6 inches of snow, also gone within days in 40 degree weather.  Then we had a day in the 70’s and people were walking around town in flip-flops and shorts.  So much for the fantasy of a white winter!  Maybe next year…

 

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For a few days in February, the way it was.

For a few days in February, the way it was.

Exeter is a town with a lovely main street filled with shops and restaurants.  To get there from the eastern side of the Squamscott River, crossing a bridge is essential.  Although, to tell the truth, when we had that delicious cold spell in January, a few people walked across the river on the ice…
 

A view from String Bridge.

A view from String Bridge.

The Great Bridge traverses the upper falls of the river.  It doesn’t seem like a bridge at all and is mostly for car traffic.  The bridge over the lower falls is named String Bridge.  No, it’s not made out of string…. There actually is little island in the center area of the river where a mill was set up in the 1640’s.  The owner threw together a bridge so his customers wouldn’t need a boat.  His bridge was made of single “stringer” logs and I imagine one needed good balance to use it.  Later, of course, this bridge expanded and became a roadway for cars.  Now people used String Bridge to go to and from town and often pause to appreciate the sounds of rushing water and the sight of the tumbling river.

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